Open Doors? Closed Doors?

Is it Appropriate to Seeking His Will based on this???

How many times do you say or you hear others referring to “open doors” and “closed doors” as an indication to what God’s will is for your lives?  Many would happily say “It was an open door and I knew God hadn’t shut it, so it is indeed His Will”.  Yes, I have done the same.  In fact I have made a major decision in that manner.  Obviously, I had to pay the drastic consequences (lasting decades) for my, what I would now call, ‘stupidity’.

We serve a living God, a God who speaks to us in a still small voice, through His Word and through various other ways.  God’s Word also tells us that faith is in the unseen (Hebrews 11:1).  Then why do we determine God’s will for our lives on the basis of what we see?

It was open… was it?

David saw the beautiful Bathsheba bathing.  When he inquired of her, he found out that her husband had gone to war.  He may have had her brought to her thinking that the husband being away was an “open” door.  This choice ended up in adultery, evil schemes, murder and the death of his son (2 Samuel chapt 11).  It is important to note that David was where he was NOT supposed to be at the time (2 Samuel 11:1).

When Paul and his companions “came to the border of Mysia, they tried to enter Bithynia, but the Spirit of Jesus would not allow them to” (Acts 16:6).  The door was “open” situation wise, but it was obviously a “closed” door in accordance with God’s perfect will.

Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God in the prison.  All the prison doors flew open.  However, Paul and Silas remained.  As a result, the jailer and his household were saved (Acts 16:22-36).  Imagine if Paul had walked out of these “open” doors.

It was closed… was it?

The Israelites arrived at Jericho and found it “was tightly shut up” (Joshua 6:1).  However, “Then the LORD said to Joshua, “See I have delivered Jericho into your hands” (6:2).  The LORD then continued speaking, giving them instructions which had to be carried out over the following week.  What if the Israelites had seen the “CLOSED” doors and turned away?  What if they had lacked faith that God could open these doors that were closed?  Ten of the 12 leaders, who went to check out the Land of Canaan, came back with negative reports.  They discouraged everyone from going to the land.  The fears of the people prohibited them from entering the Promised Land.  However the other two, Caleb and Joshua, saw the obstacles but trusted in God’s Word and His power.  They were rewarded with the land flowing with milk and honey (Numbers chapter 13).

Peter was in prison – “sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains, and sentries stood guard at the entrance”.  Wasn’t that a “Closed” door scenario?  Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell.  Peter began to follow the instructions of the angel and “followed him out of the prison, but he had no idea that what the angel was doing was really happening; he thought he was seeing a vision” (Acts 12:1-11).

Were not these ‘closed’ situations opened – were they not God’s perfect plan for the people?

These examples are just a few of the countless examples in the Bible.  It is obvious that the “open” doors could indicate that they are indeed God’s perfect will but could not necessarily be so either.

  • What are the doors in your life that are “open” that you thus feel is God’s perfect will?
  • What are the doors in your life that are “closed” that you thus feel is not of God?

Stay tuned for the next part…. “Our Mindset vs God’s Will”

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